Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics

Veni grant for 10 Faculty of Science researchers

17 July 2015

Twenty-three recent doctorate recipients have been awarded a Veni grant from the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) for research at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and the UvA’s Academic Medical Centre (AMC-UvA). Of the recipients, ten are employed at the Faculty of Science.

In total, 1124 researchers applied for a Veni grant from the NWO this year, of which 161 were successful. Each researcher will receive €250,000. With a Veni grant, they can carry out research for up to three years.

Awarded projects at the Faculty of Science

Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy

  • Dr Anne Archibald
    Mapping the Accretion Processes that Form the Universe's Most Rapidly Rotating Stars
    Some neutron stars, called millisecond pulsars, rotate hundreds of times a second because of the transfer of matter from a companion star. The details of this process are not exactly known. Using radio, optical, X-ray and gamma telescopes, Anne Archibald will look for the origins of such systems.
    Read more on the Institute website

Van ‘t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences

  • Dr Andrea Gargano
    Intact Protein Analysis (IPA)
    Many processes in the sciences are described by (non-linear) stochastic partial differential equations. For these equations, there are no explicit solutions. Numerical approximations are therefore used in order to gain an understanding of the underlying process. Through her research, Sonja Cox will demonstrate that such approximations can be made efficiently.
  • Dr Ivan Kryven
    Deterministic Modelling in Multiple Dimensions
    The evolution of large populations - such as the formation of planets from interstellar dust, the emergence of tiny crystals, or the growth of social networks - is full of hidden similarities, despite the enormous differences in scales and worlds. Ivan Kryven will develop mathematical tools to help scientists understand, simulate and predict these phenomena.
    Read more on the Institute's website

Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics

  • Dr Elly Morriën
    Soil bugs and fungal threads: restoration of nature below ground
    Ecological restoration on former agricultural land is expensive, slow and does not always lead to the desired result. Elly Morriën will focus her research on the role of soil in ecosystem development during the ecological restoration of former farmland. Through her research, she would like to find out more about secondary succession and discover ways to improve the success of ecosystem restoration.

Informatics Institute

  • Dr Sebastian Altmeyer
    The Time is Now: Timing Verification for Safety-Critical Multi-Cores
    Safety-critical computer systems embedded into cars or airplanes must work correctly, for a single failure or a wrong timing may have catastrophic consequences and cost lives. This research aims at guaranteeing the correct timing behaviour of such safety-critical systems for modern processor architectures by devising new mathematical models and tools.
  • Dr Thomas Mensink
    What & Where: Learning Visual Representations of Concepts in Context
    Millions of photos are taken every day. In order to automatically index, classify and analyse them, it is necessary to translate the images into a language understandable to humans. Thomas Mensink will explore combinations and relationships between different objects, scenes and people in an image in order to generate comprehensible translations.

Institute of Physics

  • Dr Laura Rossi 
    Design of 2-Dimensional Soft Materials
    The behaviour of single atoms and molecules that are part of larger 2D structures is difficult to study because of their small size. The researchers will prepare smart micronsize particles that will assemble into 2D structures mimicking the atomic behaviour, allowing the study of their properties at the single-particle level.
  • Dr Lisa Zeune (at FOM-Nikhef)
    Towards Realistic Predictions for New Physics Searches at the LHC
    What is our Universe made of? What is dark matter? The Large Hadron Collider aims to answer these questions by searching for new physics. This quest is only possible through realistic and accurate theoretical predictions for new physics processes. Such predictions are the aim of this project which will be carried out at FOM-Nikhef.

Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics

  • Dr Sonja Cox
    Numerical analysis of non-lineair stochastic partial differential equations
    Many processes in the sciences are described by (non-linear) stochastic partial differential equations. For these equations, there are no explicit solutions. Numerical approximations are therefore used in order to gain an understanding of the underlying process. Through her research, Sonja Cox will demonstrate that such approximations can be made efficiently.
  • Dr Guus Regts
    Making large networks mathematically understandable
    Researchers have developed the concept of graph limits in order to analyse huge networks like Facebook and the Internet with the aid of mathematics. In this project, Guus Regts will study graph limits using models from statistical mechanics.

Source: NWO

Published by  Faculty of Science